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Press release

DB Schenker transported a cylinder from Berlin to Canada

DB Schenker transported a cylinder weighing 141 metric tons from Berlin to Canada by ship, truck and plane

 (Frankfurt/Berlin/Leipzig, 27 June 2014) DB Schenker Logistics has transported a massive waste heat boiler weighing 141 metric tons from Berlin to Canada using the world's largest cargo plane, an inland waterway vessel and a heavy-load vehicle. The heavy piece from the Borsig company began its journey from Borsig's port to Edmonton in Canada under the direction of DB Schenker.

The 16-meter-long cooler was first be loaded onto an inland waterway vessel in Borsig's port on June 20 using a mobile crane weighing 1,000 metric tons. The barge then transported the piece to Aken on the Elbe River.

From there, DB Schenker used a crane to transship the waste heat boiler onto a heavy-load transport vehicle on June 23. This vehicle transported the cargo to the Leipzig/Halle Airport with one pulling and one pushing truck.

On the morning of June 25, DB Schenker began loading the boiler into the six-engine Antonov AN 225, the world's largest cargo plane. Karpeles Flight Services, the DB Schenker specialists for chartering of airplanes, handled the charter arrangements. The cylinder was pulled into the plane using a ramp and special chain hoists.

Overnight, the machine flew across Iceland to Canada, where DB Schenker's Canadian national company will handle further transport to a fertilizer factory near Edmonton. There the component will be used to cool process gas from approximately 1,000°C to 500°C and in turn create high-pressure steam. The process gas will then be further refined and ultimately leave the factory as artificial fertilizer.

DB Schenker experts from Germany and Canada spent three months planning the heavy-weight transport in minute detail.

Photos are available at: www.deutschebahn.com/mediathek

Publisher: DB Mobility Logistics AG
Potsdamer Platz 2, 10785 Berlin
Responsible for content:
Head of Communications Oliver Schumacher

Last modified: 22.08.2014

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